Tuesday, November 25, 2008

THE VAINGLORIOUS GENERAL AND HIS SUICIDAL LOVER


General Douglas MacArthur's father was General Arthur MacArthur, Jr., son of Douglas MacArthur Sr., who immigrated to the United States from Scotland, studied law, served briefly as Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin, and then became a federal judge.

His son, Arthur MacArthur, Jr., at 17, was commissioned and appointed as the Adjutant of the 24th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment in 1862; at 18, led his regiment up Missionary Ridge for which he received the Congressional Medal of Honor, and was promoted to the rank of major (skipping that of captain); at 19, was made a full colonel and commander of his regiment.

In 1875 he married Mary Pinkney Hardy ("Pinky") of Norfolk, Virginia. Their first child, Arthur III died of appendicitis, while their second child, Malcolm, died of measles. Douglas MacArthur was born in 1880.

Arthur MacArthur, Jr. was promoted to brigadier general at the outbreak of the Spanish-American War in 1898, and was sent to the Philippines. He went on to become a lieutenant general (the Army's highest ranking officer at the time),
and was the military governor of the Philippines, but was passed over for the position of Army Chief of Staff. He resigned his commission in 1909 and died in 1912 at the annual reunion of his Civil War regiment.

Douglas MacArthur, though destined to outshine everyone in the family, always had tremendous respect for his father, and talked about him frequently for the rest of his life
. But there were those who claim that the two Generals shared various negative character traits as well; the most common criticism of Douglas MacArthur is that he was vain, arrogant, egoistic, or all of the above.

Colonel Enoch H. Crowder, the first General MacArthur's aide in the Philippines, remarked later, "Arthur MacArthur was the most flamboyantly egotistical man I had ever seen, until I met his son".

Devoting
himself to living up to his father's example, In 1899, at 19, Douglas MacArthur enrolled in the United States Military Academy at West Point. On the battlefields during World War I, Douglas MacArthur was wounded, gassed, cited as "the greatest front-line general of the war," awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, and was known for leading his troops into battle carrying a riding crop.

In 1922, at 42,
Douglas MacArthur married Louise Cromwell Brooks, a divorced socialite ten years his junior with two children -- and a fortune. The unlikely union between the high-flying flapper and general ended seven years later.

Douglas MacArthur might
have acquired intellectual virtues from his father but it was his mother who played a greater role than his father in shaping his character. "You must grow up to be a great man -- like your father and Robert E. Lee," his mother had whispered to him at bedtime.

But this great love and respect he had for his mother might have been the reason
why Isabel Rosario Cooper, was relegated to the background, never to be formally introduced to his mother.

In 1929, MacArthur fell head over heels for then 16-year-old Isabel Rosario Cooper, a Scottish and Filipino-Chinese mestiza more popularly known as "Dimples." She was an actress who appeared in forgettable B-movies; one of which -- Ang Tatlong Hambog -- featured the very first kissing scene in Filipino cinema; she was at its receiving end. But more interestingly,
Isabel Rosario Cooper aka Dimples was to become the general's mistress.

When MacArthur was appointed Army Chief of Staff and moved to Washington, his mother and Dimples followed suit. While his mother lived in Fort Myer, Dimples was ensconced in an apartment near MacArthur's office adjoining the White House. All along Pinky must have remained oblivious to Dimples' existence, as well as her son's torrid relationship with her.

According to William Manchester, MacArthur "showered Dimples with presents and bought her many lacy tea gowns, but no raincoat. She didn't need one, he told her; her duty lay in bed." Dimples eventually got bored with the setup and enrolled in law school where she met many interesting young men. The general had a fit and immediately ended their relationship.

When the secret affair was discovered by a Washington Post gossip columnist, Drew Pearson, MacArthur sued him for libel. But when Pearson revealed that he had obtained very intimate correspondence between McArthur and his young mistress, including having her as a witness to be deposed, McArthur withdrew the suit and paid Pearson a substantial amount of money in exchange for the letters.

Dimples, with the $15,000 received from the general, opened a hairdressing salon somewhere in the Midwest, before moving to Los Angeles some years later. In 1960, unable to recover from the lingering emotional anguish of her failed relationship with MacArthur, she committed suicide.

The general, on the other hand, with his second wife, Jean Marie Faircloth, spent the last years of their life together in the penthouse of the Waldorf Towers (a part of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in Manhattan). It was a gift from Conrad Hilton, the owner of the hotel.
MacArthur died in Washington, DC, in 1964.



* * *


ADDITIONAL SOURCES:

The Exercise of Military Judgment:
A Philosophical Investigation of the Virtues and Vices of General Douglas MacArthur

by David W. Lutz
University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota

The American Experience: MacArthur
produced by
Austin Hoyt (Reagan), co-produced by Sarah Holt
pbs.org



TOP PHOTO:

Landing at Leyte Monument
located at the foot of the MacArthur Bridge
Santa Cruz, Manila
© Señor Enrique







* * *

Please note:
I very much appreciate my articles and photos appearing on fellow bloggers' sites, popular broadsheets, and local broadcast news segments, but I would appreciate even more a request for permission first.
Thank you!


*

Visit: MANILA PHOTOJOURNALISM


*


Labels:

posted by Señor Enrique at 8:53 AM


35 Comments:

Blogger nutart said...

Eric, you've done it again---whipped up my interest once more into reading a biography. There must be something about relationships (illegits more) that catches a person's interest towards a historical person. :-V
Douglas MacArthur's treatment of Dimples is much like an archetype of how a lot of Westerners shack up with Pinays. I hear a lot about that. It's really how one described it---aliping sa kalagitnaan (pointing to the genitalia). Pardon the explicitness too! And that Macarthur gave Dimples enough money to set up a salon---ay naku! parang narinig ko na iyan ilang beses :-D!

Another character in the annals of history molded by propagandistic historians.

So...it seems that Mahatma Gandhi is still the only one to earn the name a Great Hero and Soul?

November 25, 2008 5:53 PM  

Anonymous jhay said...

I used to admire McArthur until I read the works of Renato Constantino, I did not hated him after that, the 'legend' status of his name just no longer worked on me. ;)

November 25, 2008 6:24 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Spending my summers in Subic, Bernadette, I grew up with some kids whose mothers were from the barrio while their fathers were U.S. sailors. Some grew up without even knowing their fathers who left when their ships sailed away. However, Mrs. Imelda Gordon, with the assistance of the Red Cross, was able to trace and connect these kids with their American fathers; they all since moved to the States.

But I wonder, though, if similar relationships as you had described are commonplace all around the world, especially because of the thousands of seafaring merchant marines.

Dimples' story also reminds me of Marilyn Monroe's. Sad and tragic.

That's right ... Mahatma Gandhi may be the only true Great Hero and Soul.

November 26, 2008 9:03 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Welcome to the club, Jhay. As a kid, I used to idolize MacArthur, but as I learned more about him, my overall perception changed.

Strange that nothing was ever heard from or known about his son. All I know is that he graduated from Columbia University in New York during the early sixties.

That book on MacArthur you mentioned written by Renato Constantino seems intriguing. I've only read William Manchester's "American Ceasar."

November 26, 2008 9:08 AM  

Blogger ka tony said...

Hi Eric & Bernadette,

"So...it seems that Mahatma Gandhi is still the only one to earn the name a Great Hero and Soul?"

I agree but how about Ernesto "Che" Guevara?


I would like to add more crimes about these "Father & Son Pilipino Killers," but I will just bring to light the egoistic famous line "I Shall Return" by the "American Ceasar."

January 1942, the Japanese military forces already in Manila & winning the war in the Philippines. General MacArthur, his wife & then President Manuel Luis Quezon & his family were in Corregidor under bombardment, ready to escape on their way to Australia. Quezon left an Executive Commission headed by Jorge Vargas, which was the vehicle & embodiment of collaboration.

MacArthur before their escape, appointed Jonathan Wainwright who inherited the undesirable position of Allied commander in the Philippines. That March, Wainwright was promoted temporarily to Lieutenant General. The Japanese attacked Corregidor, no support, low on supply, arms & ammunition, on May 6, Wainwright surrendered &. June 9, the Allied forces had completely surrendered.

The Bataan-Corregidor defense was a legend woven not of American-Pilipino unity but the Pilipino loyalty to the US. The truth is US colonial & military strategy was not based on protecting the interest of the Philippines, but on preserving US colonial interest. MacArthur, ordered to surrender, to command allied forces in South West Pacific Area, sought to prolong the myth his proclamation "I Shall Return." A Pilipino president, Manuel Quezon was with him, should have been "WE SHALL RETURN." In essence his famous egoistic line, the US colonial ruler would return to retake the colony from the Japanese, while to the Pilipinos it was "The second invasion of the Gringos of our country & our interest!!!"

Maraming salamat Eric & Bernadette,
ka tony

November 26, 2008 3:55 PM  

Blogger luna miranda said...

chick boy pala si lolo dougie! so it's true that behind every macho general is a Dimple.:D

poor Dimples, she found a legendary general but lost herself in the process. tragic naman ng kanyang love story. macarthur was certainly a hero to every Filipino child when i was a kid. but with his famous vanity and self-promotion, i sometimes wonder if the lampoon on leyte landing where macarthur fell on his face when he hit the water has some grain of truth.:D

November 26, 2008 5:15 PM  

Blogger nutart said...

Ka tony, an anonymous american in one forum I write to said that che guevarra was a criminal as well. Don't really know his profile though! So I guess the americans may have this generalities about other countries' heroes without really reading on them further.

Eric, i have to say that not all westerners treat their asian paramours like aliping sa kalagitnaan. There are those who really know how to love and try their best to elevate their pinay partners to what they feel may be the proper way. But you can really point it out to basic personality types. Egoism points out to a lot of bigotry as well. Douglas M. is a typical old-fashioned type of general. The ones that I read in American playwright Tenessee Williams' plays.

Luna, I heard that story about Macarthur falling face down into the waters when I was in Leyte. So it must really be common knowledge...perhaps passed on by the Leytenos standing at the shore? Carlos Romulo was too short and had more balance :-)!

November 27, 2008 8:33 AM  

Blogger Dennis Villegas said...

I'm incidentally reading right now Manchester's "American Caesar'. As usual, well researched talaga pag si Manchester. Daming gossips and spices. I still have to make my final judgement on MacArthur, though. But right now, for me, he's one of the most intriguing and fascinating personalities in world history, at par with even Julius Caesar or Kublai Khan!

November 27, 2008 8:42 AM  

Blogger Sidney said...

What a sad love story...!

And of course I completely disagree with Nutarts comment...tsk, tsk...

Westeners have not the exclusivity of treating women like sex objects...
I even wonder how many Pinoy males don't have a couple of mistresses on the side...

Maybe we should ask former President Joseph Estrada... ;-)

November 27, 2008 9:21 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

It only further proves the fact, Ka Tony, that the Philippines, a US protectorate, was never in any position to defend itself from any invading forces. As early as 1935, Quezon was already alarmed by a possible Japanese invasion, yet the Americans didn't do anything about it.

And yes, MacArthur's "prima donna" attitude was legendary. From what I understand, while in Australia during the war, he had a yeoman "whistle" as he boarded an elevator as if he were boarding a naval ship ... hehehe.

November 27, 2008 12:58 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Hi Luna,

That landing party scene which depicted the general and some men wading through the water supposedly took more than one time: at first: he tripped and fell; second, he did it successfully and a picture was taken; finally, a Life photographer was in the area so, they had to re-do the entire scenario again for this photojournalist.

November 27, 2008 1:02 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"There are those who really know how to love and try their best to elevate their pinay partners to what they feel may be the proper way."

I was told by an OFW, Bernadette, that where she lived/worked, the Filipinas who married the local men almost always kept a Filipino lover on the side ... hehehe.

Also, I know a couple of Pinays in NYC who treated their American husbands like wimps.

Perhaps, there's good and bad in everything?

November 27, 2008 1:06 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Hi Dennis!

Read it about 20 years ago, and at that time, I was still very much impressed of the general; otherwise, I would have never bothered reading that thick book ... hehehe.

November 27, 2008 1:07 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Good point, Sidney!

I guess, it's safe to assume that it goes both ways.

November 27, 2008 1:08 PM  

Blogger ka tony said...

Hi uli Eric & Bernadette,

As a researcher one have to deal with so many books, interview people who were closed to the "subject" that you want to really know! There are always two sides of the coin & writers who idolized or really despise the "subject." Sa makatuwid walang "perpektong tao!" Even GOD himself or Christ, nagkakamali pa rin sa mata ng tao!

By the way Bernadette, if you are familiar with the two young girls who guided Mahatma Gandhi, one on his right & one on his left side as he walked around ...were just two of his many mistresses!!! Talo ni Gandhi si Mayor Lacson & MacArthur combined when it comes to sex!!! Siguro sabi tuloy ni Mayor Lacson & MacArthur na parehong naka "Rayban" kay Gandhi...
"In This Corner, I Shall Return!!!" ...he, he, he

Maraming salamat na muli Eric & Bernadette,
ka tony

November 27, 2008 1:37 PM  

Blogger nutart said...

sorry for making generalizations, Sidney! Perhaps I made an unfair remark there! Thank you for reminding me of the typical Filipino macho guy :-) and yes, i also know that some Pinay women married to westerners can "play doubles" as well.
I just live in a place where there are so many stories about the women here that makes Gen Douglas Macarthur's treatment of Dimples commonplace.

November 27, 2008 5:41 PM  

Blogger reyd said...

The General's life and times are well admired by many people. His love for our country and its citizens can only be questioned by those who don't know him.
His arrogant and controversial acts are well documented and studied by many. But why?
To smear a person's personal life? and make his critic look or act smarter than the General?..
I admire a person's achievements to all degrees.
And true to his words ~ the General had performed two things that made him famous.

"I shall return"~ which he did to liberate the Filipino people.

And

"Old sodiers never die, they just fade away" - removing himself from the public eye, living quietly in New York until his death in 1964.

I hope you have a nice Thanksgiving meal there in Pinas and please check these URLs about the General and the Philippines on the early years.

http://images.google.com/images?q=Douglas+Macarthur+source:life

http://images.google.com/images?q=philippines+source%3Alife

November 28, 2008 3:54 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"By the way Bernadette, if you are familiar with the two young girls who guided Mahatma Gandhi, one on his right & one on his left side as he walked around ...were just two of his many mistresses!!! Talo ni Gandhi si Mayor Lacson & MacArthur combined when it comes to sex!!! "

I had no idea about this, Ka Tony, though, while watching the epic movie I saw about Ghandi, I was wondering who those women were around him. From what I remember, there was even a Caucasian woman in his posse ... hehehe.

Thanks for sharing, Ka Tony!

November 28, 2008 7:38 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"I just live in a place where there are so many stories about the women here that makes Gen Douglas Macarthur's treatment of Dimples commonplace."

I guess, Bernadette, that due to the poverty that some of our local women had lived through from their childhood days, being treated as mere sexual objects by foreign monied men is more tolerable than going to bed hungry. But such ill-treatment of women has been a practice of universal phenomenon for ages, which I strongly believe, ought to be abolished.

November 28, 2008 7:43 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Trust you had a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday, Reyd! I kinda miss the Macy's parade in New York City at this time of the year.

I'm sure General MacArthur had benevolent intentions for the Philippines. No doubt about that. However, I'd like to share my response to a reader's comment to my previous post:

http://senorenrique.blogspot.com/2008/01/remembering-battle-of-manila.html


quote

As for the tragic piece of history attached to the sculpture, if you follow the pbs.org link, you will come across the part that mentions the name of Gen. Charles Willoughby, which reads in part:


"But as MacArthur's own intelligence chief, General Charles Willoughby, observed after the war, "From the day of his confident parting message to the Filipinos, 'I shall return,' no deviation from MacArthur's single-minded plan is discernible. Every battle action in New Guinea, every air raid on Rabaul or PT-boat attack on Japanese barges in the Bismark Sea, was a mere preliminary for the reconquest of the Philippines."


Reason I pointed this out is I was reading an excerpt from David Halberstam's book, "The Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War" in Vanity Fair. The article claims that Willoughby "cooked" the intelligence reports -- that there was only a "handful" of Chinese troop presence in North Korea when in fact they amounted to about 250,000.

MacArthur was reportedly hell-bent on chasing the retreating North Koreans to the Chinese border that nothing would stop him -- not orders from Washington, not intelligence reports that Mao's troops were building up in the area. And it was Willoughby who provided the bogus intelligence that supported MacArthur's intention.

In other words, it appeared that whatever MacArthur set his eye on, it was Willoughby who provided the supporting evidence -- however spurious and self-fabricated -- just to support MacArthur's intentions; despite the inevitable casualties and collateral damages that his intentions may incur.

Hence, as a result, this MacArthur-Willoughby tandem caused hundreds of Americans getting slaughtered at Unsan, one of the worst defeats of the Korean War. Immediately afterwards, Washington stripped MacArthur off of his command and ordered him to return to the States.

I can only surmise that perhaps, this magnificent duo "might" have unnecessarily caused the systematic destruction of Manila.

Also, I had the pleasure of meeting Arnold Azurin of UP. I brought up this devastation of Manila during the liberation. He recommended that I read Theodore Friend's book, "Between Two Empires" (Harvard Press). Supposedly, this should explain in large part, why the Japanese and Americans destroyed Manila as if with extreme malice and prejudice.

unquote

Thanks for the URLs, Reyd; I will check them out.

November 28, 2008 7:54 AM  

Anonymous rhodora said...

I guess personalities who made marks in shaping our history should just be remembered for the roles they played, but since they are public figures, scrutiny on their personal lives can't be helped.

There's nothing surprising naman, di ba... about these figures in history such as Gen. MacArthur having mistresses. E, look na lang at Rizal's women. Sino ba talaga ang true love niya? Si Leonor Rivera o Josephine Bracken? No one, except the national hero himself, would ever know. :)

November 28, 2008 8:02 AM  

Blogger reyd said...

There was a book written by General Charles Willoughby that I came across in one of our military libraries and I just scan it and really did not pay so much attention.
As in the case of those after thoughts by persons involved on those issues, lots of things really are coming up. But who are we to judge on what could be the end results. Will we find solice and comfort in case we find out that things should have been done the other way around to turn around history?
Or we feel good to point a finger on someone that he is the cause of the problem and not the solution.
In any case, history is written in many ways, everyone is entitled to his own opinion.

Just a thought, if all these things did not happen in our history, would I be able to see Charise Pempengco sing on the Macy's X'mas parade a few hours ago? hehehe, iniingit lang kita, it was a proud moment for Filipinos to see that young girl fulfill her dreams with the help of these modern technologies that we are using now.

or, we could be singing the Japanese national anthem each morning and do some exercise before going to work. :lol:

November 28, 2008 8:29 AM  

Anonymous rhodora said...

"But who are we to judge on what could be the end results. Will we find solace and comfort in case we find out that things should have been done the other way around to turn around history?"

I so agree with Reyd!

It's the "what if's" and the "if only's" that give us headaches and heartaches and regrets. What we should just do is move on and learn from history: repeat what is worthy and trash out what is not. :)

November 28, 2008 9:05 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"There's nothing surprising naman, di ba... about these figures in history such as Gen. MacArthur having mistresses. E, look na lang at Rizal's women."

Other than for the beautiful local women, there were great fortunes to be made here by an American in such a powerful and important position, Rhoda. MacArthur was the closest to the governor-general the country had at the time. And although there was a President Quezon, I'd be very surprised if the US had completely relinquished their "hold" on the country.

November 28, 2008 10:39 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"As in the case of those after thoughts by persons involved on those issues, lots of things really are coming up. But who are we to judge on what could be the end results. Will we find solice and comfort in case we find out that things should have been done the other way around to turn around history?"

Many more "truths" emerged when the Freedom of Information Act was put into effect. Again, Reyd, I do believe that we owe it to our children to know as much truths as possible about our past, so that we may learn from them.

I used to live a couple of blocks from Central Park West -- the Macy's parade's main route -- so it was once a tradition for me to do my early bris-kwalking exercise at Central Park, then get a cup of coffee and watch the parade. It was incredibly festive!

November 28, 2008 10:44 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"It's the "what if's" and the "if only's" that give us headaches and heartaches and regrets. What we should just do is move on and learn from history: repeat what is worthy and trash out what is not. :)"

During the US/Kuwait-Iraq conflict in the 90s, Rhoda, I was at a dinner party when one of the guests, a Jewish woman was exclaiming how the Iraqis also intended to bombard and destroy Tel Aviv. She then segued to the millions of Jews who perished during the holocaust.

I butted in and mentioned the atrocities of war, any war, including the hundreds of thousands of Filipino civilians who were massacred by the American forces during the Filipino-American war. This Jewish woman instantly waved off my comment as a mere "footnote to history" and loudly went on to outline the world's ant-Semitic sentiment during the 30's, to which I said that thousands of them were given refuge in the Philippines.

I then stood up, graciously thanked the host and left the dinner party with my girlfriend. Immediately following me to leave the party as well were my two best friends, one was Jewish, while the other a half Jew and their girl friends. The former's very good friend, by the way, at that time was the assistant to the Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations, whom I had met and enjoyed many discussions with on history over dinner.

November 28, 2008 10:56 AM  

Blogger reyd said...

Thanks rhodora, for correcting my spelling of solace. :D

Señor Enrique said...
"There's nothing surprising naman, di ba... about these figures in history such as Gen. MacArthur having mistresses. E, look na lang at Rizal's women."


Pabling ba talaga si Rizal? :D

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I don't blame that Jewish woman's exclamation of the first gulf war.

The scud, during the reign of terror of Saddam was one of the most fearful weapon that sought terror around the Middle East. Israel was very eager to retaliate and finish off Saddam but politics play a big role in changing the outcome. I was there, and I could see the fear on the face of everyone once that alarm for missile attacks starts to sound off.

Señor Enrique said...

the hundreds of thousands of Filipino civilians who were massacred by the American forces during the Filipino-American war.


According to different historians, from 20,000 up to 1.4 million Filipino casualties during that war, which is the real figure?
Many historians are just doing a dagdag-dagdag, just to make their writings of history more eye catching. I believe that any figure estimate of the casualties will be hard to prove. But the sad fact was, there were casualties from 1 person to a million Filipinos and that event really did happened. ! There was a very funny writeups about Bonifacio and the Americans --- hahaha!
On that article, it says - The American soldiers were very afraid of Andres Bonifacio because he always lead the attack ruthlessly on the Americans. or something like that. hahaha, but Bonifacio was killed by Aguinaldo's men 1-2 years before any American Cavalrymen set foot on the Philippine soil. :D

It would be nice, if all historians would tell and write the truth..

November 28, 2008 11:52 AM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

"I don't blame that Jewish woman's exclamation of the first gulf war.

The scud, during the reign of terror of Saddam was one of the most fearful weapon that sought terror around the Middle East. Israel was very eager to retaliate and finish off Saddam but politics play a big role in changing the outcome. I was there, and I could see the fear on the face of everyone once that alarm for missile attacks starts to sound off."

Believe me, Reyd, that wasn't the reason we walked out of that dinner party ... lol!

November 28, 2008 12:45 PM  

Blogger ka tony said...

This is what I believe... even if there was a single Filipino casualty during the Filipino-American war, the invasion & colonization of a country is undemocratic & inhumane! Specially for a country who was once a colony & raised its arms against it. The Filipino-American war was not as what the Gringo's call an "insurrection," it was a revolution against foreign invaders.

If we really look into the "Japanese invasion" during WW II, Japan invaded countries & territories which were colonies of the US, her ally UK & Holland: Formosa, Philippines, Malaya, Singapore, Burma, Indonesia, islands in the Pacific US territories & was moving south to Australia.

Because of MacArthur's "liberation" & his egoistic "I Shall Return," the beautiful City of Manila was named "the most devastated city after Warsaw during WW II." It was not from the Japanese shelling, napalm, tanks & bombardment, that brought the city of Manila flat to the ground, it was from the American's!

A book or two one have read & text books which our colonizers forced our schools for us to use are not enough, one have to do more reading specially books that contained another perspective.


The creation of Israel was based on myths & the Bible, that there was a "promised land," a land of milk & honey. The fact is, before WW II there was a land called Palestine, which is now erased from the map, with Palestinians who lived peacefully with 500 Samaritan Jews. After WW II Jews from different parts of Europe started an exodus to the land of Palestine & built Jewish settlement. More came, then asked a mandate to the UN for partition & creation of a Jewish state. There were two Jewish terrorist group the Irgun (Haganah) & the Maccabees, who terrorist British colonialist & Palestinians. Finally a plebiscite was passed by the UN & because of powerful & influential American Jews who were giving aid to other countries, many voted YES. The Philippines voted NO for the partition & creation of the state of Israel, but changed & voted again without considering our Muslim brothers, for a YES after harassment from Tiyo Samuel.

...why do I know? I read books - lots of them, lived in Jerusalem & my ex is from that place.


"I butted in and mentioned the atrocities of war, any war, including the hundreds of thousands of Filipino civilians who were massacred by the American forces during the Filipino-American war. This Jewish woman instantly waved off my comment as a mere "footnote to history" and loudly went on to outline the world's ant-Semitic sentiment during the 30's, to which I said that thousands of them were given refuge in the Philippines."

I wish I was there & walked out with you Eric!!!
I'm 100% with you on all your comments specially on the atrocities of war. All the way with you on your opinion, which we are entitled... Shalom!
ka tony

November 28, 2008 6:31 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Thank you, Ka Tony!

I just want to reiterate, especially for the sake of new readers/visitors that my war-related and other historical posts are not intended as general indictments against the Spaniards, Japanese, Americans, British, Dutch, and etc., and their respective society of today -- including their Filipino collaborators/allies -- for many things have changed since these events took place. Political forces have realigned that enemies have become friends and sadly, atrocities have been forgotten to the detriment of those whose justice had not been served.

And as you may agree with me, Ka Tony, to gain a better perspective of our nation at present, we sometimes have to look back at the past for certain clues as to what elements may have caused our so-called "damaged psyche/culture."

And although I have spent more of my life in the States than I have in the Philippines, I have never lost touch with my roots; hence, my great interest to learn anew about our country's history -- not to point fingers at anyone, but to gain a better understanding. Rizal spoke of the tyrants and slaves during his time; sadly, those same characters still exist today, though the faces have changed. And as it was back then, it still stands today: the possible solution in eradicating this ugly "tyrant/slave" and/or colonial mentality from our national psyche is through continued mental or intellectual, as well as spiritual, evolution. Thus, I am one of those who believe that we must continually "learn;" again, not to wallow in depressing thoughts or finger-pointing, but to learn from our mistakes so as to prevent them from happening once again. And in so doing, obliterate this vicious cycle of tyranny and slavery that permeates within our local culture.

And hopefully, in so doing, we'd evolve as better human beings, and subsequently, attain for ourselves a "better government." As the old American adage goes, "We cannot have a good government without good people."

I must also admit that although I truly enjoy learning about our history, I'm quite aware of its maze-like complexities; hence, I highly appreciate everyone's insight/input.

Many thanks, Ka Tony! I trust your Thanksgiving was wonderful :)

November 29, 2008 8:30 AM  

Blogger ka tony said...

Hi Eric,

Happy Thanksgiving Day to you again. Thank you for being a great online friend & to your wonderful website ...thank you, thank you!

Every Thanksgiving Day I cook dinner for the 30 less unfortunate kids with no family to celebrate with. It's a "turkey dinner" for my soul!

100% Tumpak ka Eric!
Sad to say most of our kababayan are shock to learn the truth! Their brain were conditioned to repel alternative point of view & just want to stick to the stories of our colonialist "brainwashing" method of teaching!


"Thus, I am one of those who believe that we must continually "learn;" again, not to wallow in depressing thoughts or finger-pointing, but to learn from our mistakes so as to prevent them from happening once again. And in so doing, obliterate this vicious cycle of tyranny and slavery that permeates within our local culture."

Tunay na magkatugma ang ating adhikain, Eric! Naririto ang eksaktong "subtitle" ko sa aking website na BanlawKasaysayan...

"NATUTUTUNAN NATIN SA KASAYSAYAN NA HINDI TAYO NATUTO!

Malaong itinago sa mundo lalo na sa ating mga Pilipino ng mga kolonyalistang mananakop ang tunay na kasaysayan ng ating lahi, upang sa ganoon ay mapagtakpan ang kanilang ginawang mga krimen, pagnanakaw nang likas ng ating bayan, pagangkin nang tagumpay, pagbura sa ating isipan nang katutubong kultura at pagalipusta sa ating onor.

Ang mithing layunin ng BanlawKasaysayan ay ihayag ang tunay na kasaysayan ng ating Mahal na Bayang Pilipinas, upang maging basehan ng mga makakabasa, dadalaw at magsisisapi sa websayt na ito. Isang paraan nang muling maibalik sa ating mga Pilipino ang naglahong: dignidad, onor, pagpapahalaga sa sarili at kinabukasang inalis, inagaw ng mga kolonyalista at nakararaming nagdaan at kasalukuyang ganid na walang kabusugang mga pulitiko sa pamahalaan.

Kung maisasapuso ang kadakilaan at sakripisyo ng ating mga bayani, ito sana'y maging isang pagsusuri sa sarili kung ano ang tunay na ibig sabihin ng "Pilipino Identity" At kung mabigyan ng tumpak na kasagutan ang "Pagkataong Pilipino", dito'y muli nating papandayin ang isang bansang ganap na malaya, maunlad, mapayapa at makatarungan para sa ating lahat, lalung-lalo na sa ating mga anak at sa susunod na salin-lahi!"

Maraming salamat na muli Eric,
ka tony

November 29, 2008 1:43 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Hi Ka Tony,

Just came across this quote which I think aptly applies to this entire series of exchanges:

"Fear history, for it respects no secrets" - Gregoria de Jesus

November 30, 2008 10:00 AM  

Blogger Amadeo said...

Finding flaws in the public’s heroes or revered persons is no surprise, since we accept all men have flaws, some more than others. But still no reason to completely disregard the good deeds that they have done.

Mention was made of Gandhi, but if one Googles “Gandhi sleeping with virgins” one can also find enough narratives to start doubting maybe some of his most noble of intentions and/or pronouncements.

Here’s one to illustrate:

http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2521/did-mahatma-gandhi-sleep-with-virgins

December 01, 2008 8:16 PM  

Blogger Señor Enrique said...

Very interesting glimpse on Ghandi's life, Amadeo. Thanks for sharing :)

December 03, 2008 1:24 AM  

Blogger dave (",) said...

Quite interesting exchanges in here, and good concluding statement Señor:

"I am one of those who believe that we must continually 'learn' again, not to wallow in depressing thoughts or finger-pointing, but to learn from our mistakes so as to prevent them from happening once again. And in so doing, obliterate this vicious cycle of tyranny and slavery that permeates within our local culture."

I've been made aware back in college of historians projecting their agendas when writing their history books, and I could see this here in this comment section, making me roll my eyes cynically again.

January 15, 2009 6:14 PM  

Post a Comment

<< Home

Life in Manila as observed by a former New Yorker who with a laptop and camera has reinvented himself as a storyteller. Winner of the PHILIPPINE BLOG AWARDS: Best Photo Blog in 2007 and three Best Single Post awards in 2008.

 
 

About Me

Name: Señor Enrique
Location: Manila, Philippines

View my complete profile

Links


www.flickr.com
This is a Flickr badge showing photos in a set called Flickr Badge. Make your own badge here.
 
 
Señor Enrique Home
Designed by The Dubai Chronicles.
All rights and lefts reserved.